Paleo Plan

Teriyaki Chicken

Makes dinner for two, with leftovers for lunch.

Approximate cooking time: 35 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 Tbs coconut oil
  • 1 lb boneless, skinless chicken breasts
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 medium yellow onion, diced
  • coconut aminos (tastes like soy sauce)
  • 1 cup pineapple, diced
  • 1 medium red pepper, diced
  • 3 romaine hearts

Instructions

  1. Prepare all vegetables.
  2. Cut chicken breasts into 1" pieces, and season lightly with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.
  3. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat and add coconut oil when hot.
  4. Add onions and chicken to the pan and cook about 5 minutes.
  5. Add a small splash of coconut aminos (about 2 Tbs), and continue to cook another 5 minutes.
  6. Add pineapple and peppers and cook until chicken is cooked and vegetables are tender.
  7. Serve over chopped romaine.

24 Comments

  1. New to this! Can you have steamed veggie’s with this or salad? Or is this all you get?

    • Jason G.

      Unless you are *really* focusing on weight loss, you can pretty much add steamed vegetables to any meal without worrying too much. For instance, a whole red pepper has around 20 calories, and a cup of broccoli has around 45 calories. So, pretty safe to add.

  2. heyoulady

    The husband made this tonight so when I came home from work and walked into the house all I smelled was sweet yumminess! He added a little cornstarch to thicken the sauce a bit (it was runny) and used skinless boneless chicken thighs. Is there a better thickener to use other than cornstarch with these recipes that have sauces? All in all a very filling meal.

    • We’re happy you liked it. Try using tapioca starch/flour next time. It’s very similar in texture to corn starch.

  3. April1900

    Is there anything else I can use besides coconut aminos? It is very hard to find.

    • @April1900 – You an order them online, but some people make the exception in this case for tamari if they don’t have an overt sensitivity to soy. If you can’t tolerate tamari, just use salt. Anyone else have any suggestions?

  4. MKMBeaulieu

    I was able to find coconut aminos on amazon.com for about $15. Not cheap, but you use so little in dishes, we figured we’d try it out.

    I also found this recipe for “soy-less soy sauce” on Allrecipes.com but I would sub out the molasses for raw honey unless I was in a real pinch, and then, only blackstrap. Haven’t tried it, but a friend recommended. Now that I think about it, I’m not all that sure about the potentially shady background behind making beef bullion… Neely/Josh any comments about bullion??

    INGREDIENTS
    4 tablespoons beef bouillon
    4 teaspoons balsamic vinegar
    2 teaspoons dark molasses
    1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
    1 pinch white pepper
    1 pinch garlic powder
    1 1/2 cups water

    DIRECTIONS
    In a saucepan over medium heat, stir together the beef bouillon, balsamic vinegar, molasses, ginger, white pepper, garlic powder and water. Boil gently until liquid is reduced to about 1 cup, about 15 minutes.

    • @MKMBeaulieu – Bouillon can be fine as long as all the ingredients are Paleo. You just need to check that out. Otherwise, use a pre-made broth or a homemade broth instead.

  5. donnyriz

    Coconut aminos can be found at the Vitamin Shoppe and Sprouts (Henry’s) for about $7 a bottle.

  6. i substituted oranges and added artichokes. mmmm.

  7. Adrianna

    Yumm, it’s a favorite. Although I think it’s better the day after. And I could do without the chopped romain. The chicken itself is delicious tho!

  8. If I were to use a teryiaki chicken recipe from a non Paleo site and change it to a Paleo friendly recipe, would the amount of coconut aminos be a 1 to 1 measurement of a recipe with soy sauce! For instance, if the recipe asks for a 1/2 cup of soy sauce, would I use a 1/2 cup of coconut aminos?

  9. Coconut Aminos can be found at Whole Foods in the same section as the soy sauces and tamari. It is on the bottom shelf at my store about is easy to miss. It’s about $7 a bottle.

  10. Katherine Rowland

    I used the left over leek greens as a substitute for the onion. (just had to cook the greens for a few minutes before adding the chicken so they wouldn’t be tough) Fabulous!

    Also, I really like to “play” with my food in addition to the fact I feel like I eat salad everything…, so instead of topping the romaine leaves, I bought romaine hearts and scooped in the scrumptous medley!

    Ta da! and Super happy tummy!

  11. Nk9090

    What are romania hearts ??

  12. “Add pineapple and peppers and cook until chicken is cooked and vegetables are tender.”
    Why do you refuse to put a time range for stuff like this over and over again????
    A time range would be so helpful.

  13. I made this tonight and really liked it. I added a package of mushrooms, which was a really nice addition. I also added more coconut aminos. When the mushrooms cooked down a bit, that added some liquid to the the mix. To thicken it up, I added about 2 teaspoons worth of arrowroot powder and it made it into a really nice gravy type. I served this over gluten free rice. I really really enjoyed it.

  14. I can find coconut aminos in my country.. What can I use instead coconut aminos for chicken teriyaki recipe? Thank you.. I’m a beginner to start paleo diet to lose weight..

    • Neely Quinn

      Lifia – I don’t know of any other substitute really. Can you order them on amazon in your country?

  15. You could use chia flour (from ground chia seeds) as a thickener as well…although be warned that Paleo “experts” are still debating whether or not chia seeds are actually a Paleo approved food.

  16. JP Cullen

    So good and so simple. Love these 35 minute recipes. Must admit I did use rice. It is a cheat I know, but from time to time I will do a little carb loading.

  17. Kelley W

    That was lovely and really refreshing! Loved it on the bed of lettuce!!! It was more of what I would classify as a Hawaiian dish though, particularly with the pineapple! Grayzoe, I think putting a timeframe to soften vegetables etc., is so hard because some people cook with gas, others electric and timeframe depends on how high “your” medium/high is, how thick your veges are chopped etc and what the vegetables are – it’s pretty obvious as you’re cooking. That’s my take on it anyway! :)

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