Paleo Trail Mix

Serving size is a half cup. Feel free to be creative with other nuts, seeds, and dried fruits with this recipe to make it your own.

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Paleo Trail Mix

Servings 8

Total Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Nutrition Information

calories 360

carbohydrate 32g

protein 12g

fat 24g

Ingredients

  • 1 cup(s) almonds whole
  • 1/2 cup(s) cashews, raw whole
  • 1/2 cup(s) pumpkin seeds, raw
  • 1/2 cup(s) sunflower seeds, raw
  • 1/2 cup(s) raisins (golden raisins suggested)
  • 1/2 cup(s) currants, dried
  • 1/2 cup(s) blueberries, dried

Instructions

  1. Combine all ingredients and store in an air tight container. No cooking or baking necessary.

Comments

  1. Am I okay to guess that 4 cups of this yields to 16 servings of 1/4 cups?

    I am trying to figure out the calories and came up with a total of 2450 calories for this whole mix and then when broken down to about 156 calories for each serving (1.4 cup). Either way it’s delicious!

  2. I am looking for a healthy fuel for my triathlons with a 25% Fat, 25% Protein and 50% Carbs combination. Are there any easy combination’s/recipe’s on this site that will meet this requirement?

  3. @Neely – Yes during the triathlon, I am trying to avoid all the sugar packed gels and sports drinks. I was looking at some recipes that had sprouted seeds to allow for quick digestion, which I think is a great idea. I just want to make it fit the 25,25,50 ratios I mentioned.

    1. @heysteve988 – Well, I’d try out some trail mixes that meet those requirements. However, definitely DEFINITELY try eating those things on long training workouts to see how you do with digesting them. Not sure it’s the best thing to be eating when you’re doing that kind of workout. That’s the (only) beauty of the gel packs, etc. This is when a lot of serious paleo athletes will stray from the diet, understandably. Because eating nuts and dried fruit during a competitive event isn’t optimal. I also have enduro clients who use honey packs and almond butter during events and long rides. You could try some combo of fruit juice, coconut milk and almond butter blended, or just take the protein out of the equation since it’s so hard to digest while you’re running/biking/swimming. Just make sure you’re eating really well beforehand and afterward, and make sure you eat enough before the race so you don’t bonk before your first fueling at around the 45 min -1 hour point. I’ll have more posts on this in the near future. Not sure you want to follow a 25/25/50 ratio, but that’s of course your call. Good luck!

    1. @stap2315 – Well, we try to leave that up to you, since everyone’s size is so different. If you’re a small female, eat around 1/4 – 1/2 cup. If you’re a large male, you should eat more, especially if you’re not trying to lose weight. Depends on how many calories you need.

  4. OK, I am just totally ignorant. What type of currant should be used for this? Here’s a key sentence from Wikipedia: “Ribes includes the currants, including the edible currants (blackcurrant, redcurrant and whitecurrant), gooseberries, and many ornamental plants. The Ribes currant should not be confused with the Zante currant grape.”

  5. This recipe states approximate cooking time: 10 minutes.

    Instructions say to combine all ingredients and store in an air tight container.

    Do you combine and bake and at what temp? Or do you just combine and eat as is? Then store…

    1. RME – I changed the recipe’s instructions to state that there is no cook or bake time for this recipe. Sorry for the confusion!

  6. I love this snack, especially for my kids and camping, but I have a hard time finding dried fruit (blueberries) without fruit juice. Do you use these or is there an alternative? Boulder-based, sugar-free.

  7. This stuff is amazing. I was a little wary because I really don’t normally like a lot of nuts and seeds, or even dried fruit for that matter. But the combination is perfect and gives me the sweet taste I’ve been missing not eating chocolate. Love this!

    1. snyders – It doesn’t matter, but remember that soaked nuts are the best, so if you get raw nuts, put them in water overnight, dump the water and let them dry out and then eat them. It helps make them more digestible. Too many unsoaked nuts can wreak havoc on a lot of people…

  8. Trail mix is a go-to snack for me since going paleo, I’ll have to try out you’re mix! I have a Paleo Power Bar recipe on my blog if you want to check it out :)

  9. The only dried blueberries I can find have some kind of oil listed as an ingredient-sunflower oil usually. Is this okay or are there dried fruits I can purchase that do not have oil?

    1. Chandra – Yes, there are definitely dried fruits you can find without oil. It’s not the worst thing in the world, but we’re trying to stay away from the omega 6s and sunflower oil is chock full of the stuff :)

  10. Hi

    Can I soak the nuts in bulk, drain the water, leave to dry and after mixing leave in an airtight container?

    If so how long can i keep them for?

    Do I soak all nuts or is particularly almonds?

    thanks :)

  11. I have the same question about soaking the nuts in water. With this trail mix, do I soak all of the nuts? And can I soak all the nuts together in the same bowl?
    Thanks!! :)

  12. I am allergic to peanuts ( all types including cashew and almonds) is there a no nut mix? Could I use like granola or dried fruit?

    1. Hi Epic,

      We do not currently have a nut-free trail mix but developing one was just added to my “to do” list! This recipe will work just fine if you double up on the pumpkin and sunflower seeds and leave out the almonds and cashews. I wouldn’t add granola because it is likely full of non-Paleo ingredients such as oats and added sugar.

      Sally

  13. @Inj1n7oE I had the same question. It sounds like “real” currants aren’t widely available in the U.S.. Currants in the US are usually “Zante Currants” which are just small grapes. They have a different flavor than actual currants (tart vs sweet). I’ve seen them sold online though, but it probably doesn’t matter for this recipe like Neely said.

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